#Mosomelt 2019 Week 4: Building your eportfolio

This week we invite you to turn your WordPress Blog into an eportfolio: making it into a hub for your mobile social media platforms of choice.

To do this you customise your WordPress site in the ‘dashboard’ or “My Sites” section when logged into WordPress. For example use the WordPress Links section to add links then display them via the Wordpress Links Widget for linking your online activity https://wordpress.com/customize/:

Some articles re educational blogging and eportfolios that you may find interesting for further reading:

Traxler, John, & Wishart, Jocelyn (Eds.). (2011). Making mobile learning work: Case studies of practice. Bristol: ESCalate, University of Bristol, Graduate School of Education. http://escalate.ac.uk/downloads/8250.pdf

Buchem, Ilona. (2011). Serendipitous learning: Recognizing and fostering the potential of microblogging. Form@re, 2011(74 February/March), 3. http://formare.erickson.it/wordpress/it/2011/serendipitous-learning-recognizing-and-fostering-the-potential-of-microblogging/

Farmer, James, & Bartlett-Bragg, Anne. (2005). Blogs @ anywhere: High fidelity online communication. In H. Goss (Ed.), 22nd ascilite conference: Balance, fidelity, mobility. Maintaining the momentum? (pp. 197 – 203). Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology. http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/brisbane05/blogs/proceedings/22_Farmer.pdf

Downes, Stephen. (2004). Educational blogging. Educause Review, September/October, 14-26. https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0450.pdf

#CMALT portfolio examples

A list of Australasian CMALT holders can be found at: http://ascilite.org/get-involved/cmalt/

Example AUT CMALT portfolios

#Mosomelt 2017 Week 6: “Developing Open Scholarship”

This week we explore updating the concept of the Scholarship Of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) for the post web 2.0 age: You are encouraged to establish ResearchgateMendeley, Google Scholar, and ORCID profiles, becoming active participants within online reflective practice research communities. Sharing your innovations in teaching and learning for peer review and feedback is a great way to reflect upon your teaching practice in a much deeper level and also learn from others.

  • “Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network. Make your own fully-searchable library in seconds, cite as you write, and read and annotate your PDFs on any device.” (https://www.mendeley.com)
  • Researchgate is fast becoming the ‘LinkedIn’ of academic researchers: http://researchgate.net
  • ORCID is the Open Researcher and Contributor ID – a way of consolidating your research profiles such as SCOPUSID (Elsevier) and ResearcherID (Web Of Science). For example, my ORCID profile is http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0192-6118. While ORCID is relatively new, many open journal systems now provide an author profile field for their ORCID.
  • Download the Mendeley App (iOS and Android), create a bookmark for Researchgate.com, link your Researchgate and Mendeley profiles on your WordPress blog or embed their widgets. Start building a research community by following one another on these online communities.

Combining Open Scholarship with sharing of your research via Social Media provides an alternative way of measuring the impact of your research (via ALTMETRICs) while also enhancingtraditional research impact measures (increasing downloads/reads/citation counts). Most institutional research database systems now provide links to research article impact factors via both traditional databases (e.g. SCOPUS & Web Of Science) and Altmetrics. Therefore there is a compelling case for researchers to engage with social media to share their research via Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, etc…

For example:

Reflect on this process on your WordPress blog.

 

Suggested readings:

Brembs, Björn, Button, Katherine, & Munafò, Marcus. (2013). Deep impact: Unintended consequences of journal rank. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7(Article 291), 1-12. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00291 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00291/full#impact

Buckland, Amy, & Bass, Michelle. (2015, 8 December 2015). Author and research identifiers. Retrieved 27 January, 2016, from http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID

Costa, Cristina. (2014). The habitus of digital scholars. Research in Learning Technology, 21http://www.researchinlearningtechnology.net/index.php/rlt/article/view/21274

Garnett, Fred, & Ecclesfield, Nigel. (2011). Towards a framework for co-creating open scholarship. In D. Hawkridge, K. Ng & S. Verjans (Eds.), Proceedings of alt-c 2011 – thriving in a colder and more challenging climate: The 18th international conference of the association for learning technology(pp. 199-216). University of Leeds, UK: ALT Association for Learning Technology. http://repository.alt.ac.uk/2177/

Greenhow, Christine, & Gleason, Benjamin. (2014). Social scholarship: Reconsidering scholarly practices in the age of social media. British Journal of Educational Technology, 45(3), 392-402. doi: 10.1111/bjet.12150  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12150

Haigh, Neil. (2010). the scholarship of teaching & learning: A practical introduction and critique. Ako Aotearoa, National Office, Wellington, New Zealand: Ako Aotearoa. https://akoaotearoa.ac.nz/download/ng/file/group-4/the-scholarship-of-teaching–learning—a-practical-introduction-and-critique.pdf

Orr, Philip, & Blinstrub, Ashley. (2015). Impact measures and published scholarship.  Retrieved from http://usi.libguides.com/impactmeasures

Priem, J, Taraborelli, D, Goth, P, & Neylon, C. (2010, 26 October). Altmetrics: A manifesto.   Retrieved 19 June, 2015, from http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/

Terras, Melissa. (2012). The impact of social media on the dissemination of research: Results of an experiment. Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(3), np. http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-3/the-impact-of-social-media-on-the-dissemination-of-research-by-melissa-terras/

UC Library. (2015, 26 November 2015). Researcher profile. Retrieved 27 January, 2016, from http://canberra.libguides.com/content.php?pid=157360&sid=4381638

Weaver, Debbi, Robbie, Diane, Kokonis, Sue, & Miceli, Lucia. (2012). Collaborative scholarship as a means of improving both university teaching practice and research capability. International Journal for Academic Development, 18(3), 237-250. doi: 10.1080/1360144x.2012.718993 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2012.718993

Weller, Martin. (2014). The battle for open: How openness won and why it doesn’t feel like victory. London: Ubiquity Press. http://www.ubiquitypress.com/site/books/detail/11/battle-for-open/

Williams, Catherine, & Padula, Danielle. (2015). The evolution of impact factors: From bibliometrics to altmetrics (pp. 31).  Retrieved from http://docs.scholastica.s3.amazonaws.com/altmetrics/evolution-of-impact-indicators.pdf

#mosomelt Welcome to 2017 and preparing for CMALT portfolio submissions

Annual submission dates for CMALT portfolio submissions are: 1 Feb, 1 June, 1 October.

You can find links to support documentation and example links at: https://www.alt.ac.uk/certified-membership/cmalt-support

Also for those also considering submission of a portfolio for HEA Senior Fellow there is close overlap with a CMALT portfolio.

You can find HEA fellowship information at:

https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ukpsf

https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/recognition-accreditation/hea-fellowships

An example of a dual CMALT/HEA-SF portfolio has been kindly shared by Fiona Harvey:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/18vJs81tWrlhs7KlfbNTnK3YSzMlP4CmcJsA_7_lnXvI/pub

https://pathbrite.com/fionaharvey1/DZdA

 

 

#mosomelt 2016 Fine’

We’ve come to the end of the second iteration of the #Mosomelt cMOOC – well done to all our participants! We encourage you to continue by putting together a CMALT portfolio to submit for CMALT accreditation – see the CMALT section of https://mosomelt.wordpress.com/cmalt for more details or contact us for more info or help with CMALT.

Also we are keen to improve Mosomelt for a third iteration in Semester 2 2016 – please recommend any of your colleagues to signup if you think they would benefit.

Finally we want to get your feedback on how we can improve Mosomelt. We have an information sheet, consent form, and online survey for your feedback. Lisa Ransom will post the feedback invitation and links to G+ shortly.

Once again – thanks to all our 2015 & 2016 #mosomelt participants – we hope you have enjoyed the journey!

Thom, Vickel, Victorio.